3.14.2009

CCCC 2009

CCCC 2009 in San Francisco was really great: a wide range of topics, plenty of interesting exchanges, nice people, and food. Oh: walking too.

For me, the highlight of the conference was getting to go to so many panels on video games, mainly MMOs. As I'm just getting into this area of research, I learned a lot from what I heard and saw.

As I mentioned to a few people at the conference, my presentation is now online. It's on YouTube in two parts, both of which I'll syndicate below. I've also updated my web.projects page over at metaspencer.com, so you should be able to find the presentation there as well.

I received plenty of useful comments and questions (both in the panel and later in the hallways), so I post the presentation knowing that, in future iterations, I'll be able to pull the ideas together in some more interesting and robust ways.

Part I:



Part II:



UPDATE: A detailed blog post by Elizabeth Losh discussing the session at CCCC 2009.

4 comments:

  1. What a terrific performance. Talk about delivering the goods. Lots of great information. And fun to watch. I'm sure the reaction was positive. Any plans for extending into classroom situations? Again, this was really great.

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  2. Thanks, DA! Yeah, I'm teaching an MCing project this term ... it's described on my course site here:

    http://www.english.illinois.edu/-people-/faculty/schaffner/w4w/project7.html

    I'm eager to see what the people in the class do.

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  3. excellent work! much better than any powerpoint I've ever seen. Your emphasis on performance and powerpoint got me thinking---I wrote an article on powerpoint failure for the velvet light trap, a cinema journal:
    http://sites.google.com/site/theresearchsiteforlisanakamura/Home/plugandpray.docx?attredirects=0

    sorry for the long link. anyway, academics are often not the most skilled at this performance, but we are so scrutinized. somehow multimedia virtuosity in academe is very rare and sometimes viewed as suspect, especially by older faculty, I think. having shabby powerpoint is a sign of authenticity among some in the humanities.

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  4. Very cool, Lisa. I'm always trying to catch up to you! :)

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